Executive Briefings

RFID Tags, Readers ID Locations of Thousands of Workers at Giant Chinese Nuclear Power Plant

The Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant, part of the China National Nuclear Corp., has deployed a system that uses passive ultrahigh-frequency RFID tags and readers to identify the locations of thousands of workers, according to zone, as well as help locate individuals in the event of an emergency and prevent anyone from entering unauthorized areas.

Since installing the solution last year, the company has also been able to use it to verify workers' hours, according to Sun International, the system's provider.

Qinshan, located approximately 100 kilometers (62.1 miles) southwest of Shanghai, is one of the largest nuclear power plants in the world, with nine reactors spread across a 10-square-kilometer (3.9-square-mile) area. On a typical day, about 7,000 workers and contractors are on site at any given time.

Chinese regulations, dictated by the National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA), require that nuclear facilities be able to monitor the locations of individuals at their site during an evacuation. This typically has been accomplished using a manual paper-and-pen process. Hundreds of workers serve as emergency managers, each assigned to oversee a particular assembly point. At each assembly point, area workers gather to be accounted for and escorted off the premises aboard buses. The emergency manager writes down each individual's name, or checks it off a list. This process is slow, however, and vulnerable to errors since it doesn't list anyone who might have come on site that day but failed to report to the assembly point.

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Since installing the solution last year, the company has also been able to use it to verify workers' hours, according to Sun International, the system's provider.

Qinshan, located approximately 100 kilometers (62.1 miles) southwest of Shanghai, is one of the largest nuclear power plants in the world, with nine reactors spread across a 10-square-kilometer (3.9-square-mile) area. On a typical day, about 7,000 workers and contractors are on site at any given time.

Chinese regulations, dictated by the National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA), require that nuclear facilities be able to monitor the locations of individuals at their site during an evacuation. This typically has been accomplished using a manual paper-and-pen process. Hundreds of workers serve as emergency managers, each assigned to oversee a particular assembly point. At each assembly point, area workers gather to be accounted for and escorted off the premises aboard buses. The emergency manager writes down each individual's name, or checks it off a list. This process is slow, however, and vulnerable to errors since it doesn't list anyone who might have come on site that day but failed to report to the assembly point.

Read Full Article