Executive Briefings

RFID Used to Help Recycle Materials from Cast-off Electronics Gear

When discarded computers and printers arrive at its facility, Sinctronics uses RFID readers to identify their component materials so they can be more quickly recycled and incorporated into new IT products.

Radio frequency identification is part of the set of cutting-edge technologies and innovations adopted by Sinctronics, which calls itself a Green IT Innovation Center. Located in Sorocaba, a city in the Brazilian state of São Paulo, Sinctronics operates what it says is Brazil's first integrated ecosystem for electronic products, processing 100 tons of discarded equipment per month, and generating raw material for the manufacture of new products, thereby reducing the extraction of natural resources, saving energy and reducing carbon emissions.

"This is the world's first plant for recycling discarded electronic products that was built next to a new manufacturing plant, which is fully prepared to receive the materials and parts produced by the recycling plant," says Carlos Ohde, the general manager of Sinctronics, whose facilities are located just a few hundred meters away from a plant operated by Flextronics, which manufactures printers for HP Brasil. "It is the only one in the world with these characteristics, as far as we know."

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Radio frequency identification is part of the set of cutting-edge technologies and innovations adopted by Sinctronics, which calls itself a Green IT Innovation Center. Located in Sorocaba, a city in the Brazilian state of São Paulo, Sinctronics operates what it says is Brazil's first integrated ecosystem for electronic products, processing 100 tons of discarded equipment per month, and generating raw material for the manufacture of new products, thereby reducing the extraction of natural resources, saving energy and reducing carbon emissions.

"This is the world's first plant for recycling discarded electronic products that was built next to a new manufacturing plant, which is fully prepared to receive the materials and parts produced by the recycling plant," says Carlos Ohde, the general manager of Sinctronics, whose facilities are located just a few hundred meters away from a plant operated by Flextronics, which manufactures printers for HP Brasil. "It is the only one in the world with these characteristics, as far as we know."

Read Full Article