Executive Briefings

RTLS, as Once Envisioned, Isn't Cutting Edge in the Hospital. But That May Be Changing.

Of late, real-time locating systems (RTLS) have been making an entree in the hospital environment. The concept is simple-medical equipment is expensive, and hospitals usually buy more than they seem to need, since when you need it-you must have it. Lives are to be saved, patients are to be transported, tests are to be done, and so what is the big deal about buying extra? Busy staff are unlikely to return these assets once they use them-they are off to the next ringing bell.

Early projects with RTLS were useful, had ROI, but were bland. Wheel chairs, pumps, monitors, etc., are tagged and then located. But early RTLS projects introduced yet another layer of technology to the mass of devices already in use, with more training on yet another technology, another procedure.

People, Patients and Things...

The reality is, although these projects might be interesting, there has not been too much growth in the "tracking things in the hospital business." Not that the projects don't have value, but these project have to compete for investment dollars along with many other expenses. When you can buy a new MRI or latest equipment for a cutting-edge procedure, or optimize the scheduling to increase the numbers of available beds producing increased revenue, that is more likely where the money will go.

RTLS, as envisioned in the past, just doesn't touch the foundation of where the action is in the hospital.

Read Full Article

Of late, real-time locating systems (RTLS) have been making an entree in the hospital environment. The concept is simple-medical equipment is expensive, and hospitals usually buy more than they seem to need, since when you need it-you must have it. Lives are to be saved, patients are to be transported, tests are to be done, and so what is the big deal about buying extra? Busy staff are unlikely to return these assets once they use them-they are off to the next ringing bell.

Early projects with RTLS were useful, had ROI, but were bland. Wheel chairs, pumps, monitors, etc., are tagged and then located. But early RTLS projects introduced yet another layer of technology to the mass of devices already in use, with more training on yet another technology, another procedure.

People, Patients and Things...

The reality is, although these projects might be interesting, there has not been too much growth in the "tracking things in the hospital business." Not that the projects don't have value, but these project have to compete for investment dollars along with many other expenses. When you can buy a new MRI or latest equipment for a cutting-edge procedure, or optimize the scheduling to increase the numbers of available beds producing increased revenue, that is more likely where the money will go.

RTLS, as envisioned in the past, just doesn't touch the foundation of where the action is in the hospital.

Read Full Article