Executive Briefings

Shipping Authority to Test Onboard IoT Marine Equipment

This year, a number of Danish organizations will be running a pilot Internet of Things project to test the collection of real-time data from equipment onboard ships. The Aalborg-based company GateHouse is behind the pilot project, and a number of other companies including the shipowner Uni-Tankers, Logimatic and the Danish Maritime Authority will contribute to the testing of the new technology.

The Internet of Things refers to the wireless networking of physical things consisting of installed sensors, electronics and software enabling the 'things' to collect and exchange data.

In practice, the Danish solution consists of a number of sensors that measure the condition of the ship's equipment and record emissions from the ship. All the sensor-generated information is collected and continuously transmitted to shore in real-time, where stakeholders with access to the data can use the information for various purposes, including ongoing optimization of the machinery, more efficient maintenance, ongoing fuel consumption optimization and continuous emission monitoring.

For the marine equipment industry, it offers developments in condition-based maintenance and services for ship operators. For the authorities, the focus is on being able to continuously monitor whether ships' sulfur and NOx emissions comply with regulatory limits.

For a couple of years, the Danish Maritime Authority has been working on big data to and from ships under the auspices of the E.U.-funded project EfficienSea2. The intention is to couple the experience gained from the new pilot project where data are transmitted live to shore with elements of the EfficienSea2 project.

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The Internet of Things refers to the wireless networking of physical things consisting of installed sensors, electronics and software enabling the 'things' to collect and exchange data.

In practice, the Danish solution consists of a number of sensors that measure the condition of the ship's equipment and record emissions from the ship. All the sensor-generated information is collected and continuously transmitted to shore in real-time, where stakeholders with access to the data can use the information for various purposes, including ongoing optimization of the machinery, more efficient maintenance, ongoing fuel consumption optimization and continuous emission monitoring.

For the marine equipment industry, it offers developments in condition-based maintenance and services for ship operators. For the authorities, the focus is on being able to continuously monitor whether ships' sulfur and NOx emissions comply with regulatory limits.

For a couple of years, the Danish Maritime Authority has been working on big data to and from ships under the auspices of the E.U.-funded project EfficienSea2. The intention is to couple the experience gained from the new pilot project where data are transmitted live to shore with elements of the EfficienSea2 project.

Read Full Article