Executive Briefings

Shoe Retailer Decides Barcodes Work Better Than RFID for Keeping Tabs on Inventory

Describing radio frequency identification labels as a "learning tool," Peltz Shoes has stopped using the technology, primarily because of high costs related to the passive tags, and changed to a barcode system.

Shoe Retailer Decides Barcodes Work Better Than RFID for Keeping Tabs on Inventory

The independent Florida shoe retailer began using RFID tags in 2009, according to a company statement. They were used to label the retailer's entire product selection in stores and the warehouse.

In addition to its radio frequency identification function, the tags were also used to provide detailed label information on the shoe boxes to provide brand, style, color, size and price. At the time, Vice President and CEO Gary Peltz said the growing RFID technology could increase efficiency in tracking and inventory management that would ultimately contribute to accurate inventory counts.

"Managing inventory across four physical locations (the retailer now has six) inclusive of over 46,000 square feet of floor space can be a challenging task," he said in a statement issued in 2010. "By leveraging technology, we know exactly what we have in stock, where it is physically placed, and can automatically reorder product to promptly fulfill our customer's orders. Our vision has never been to be the biggest, but to be the best."

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The independent Florida shoe retailer began using RFID tags in 2009, according to a company statement. They were used to label the retailer's entire product selection in stores and the warehouse.

In addition to its radio frequency identification function, the tags were also used to provide detailed label information on the shoe boxes to provide brand, style, color, size and price. At the time, Vice President and CEO Gary Peltz said the growing RFID technology could increase efficiency in tracking and inventory management that would ultimately contribute to accurate inventory counts.

"Managing inventory across four physical locations (the retailer now has six) inclusive of over 46,000 square feet of floor space can be a challenging task," he said in a statement issued in 2010. "By leveraging technology, we know exactly what we have in stock, where it is physically placed, and can automatically reorder product to promptly fulfill our customer's orders. Our vision has never been to be the biggest, but to be the best."

Read Full Article

Shoe Retailer Decides Barcodes Work Better Than RFID for Keeping Tabs on Inventory