Executive Briefings

So, Maybe Plastic Isn't So Bad for Environment After All?

There isn't a single person in the plastics industry who hasn't been regularly bombarded with concerns from all sides about the environmental costs of plastic production and use. But a new study takes some of the sting out, finding the environmental cost of using plastics in consumer goods and packaging is nearly four times less than replacing plastics with alternative materials.

Trucost's latest study, "Plastics and Sustainability: A Valuation of Environmental Benefits, Costs and Opportunities for Continuous Improvement," builds on a 2014 study the research company did for the United Nations Environment Program, using the same methodology and “natural capital accounting” metrics.

Trucost estimates that swapping plastic for alternatives such as glass, tin or aluminum would increase environmental costs from $139bn to $533bn — that’s taking into account ocean damage, end-of-life management, transportation, production and material and energy recovery costs and impact.

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Trucost's latest study, "Plastics and Sustainability: A Valuation of Environmental Benefits, Costs and Opportunities for Continuous Improvement," builds on a 2014 study the research company did for the United Nations Environment Program, using the same methodology and “natural capital accounting” metrics.

Trucost estimates that swapping plastic for alternatives such as glass, tin or aluminum would increase environmental costs from $139bn to $533bn — that’s taking into account ocean damage, end-of-life management, transportation, production and material and energy recovery costs and impact.

Read Full Article