Executive Briefings

Some Discouraging Words from the SOA Front

For a number of years service-oriented architecture (SOA) has been widely promoted as a panacea to many of the problems industry is facing particularly the requirement to reduce costs and increase agility. Analysts, vendors and end users alike appear united in their enthusiasm for it. Butler Group, for example, tells us that only 3 percent of organizations have rejected SOA. And a recent survey by systems integrator Griffiths Waite found that 2008 is a critical year for SOA implementation, with 15 percent of organizations already running SOA and a much larger 38 percent progressing towards it. Of the 47 percent still "contemplating" it, Griffith Waite says, "evidence suggests these will (start to) move into strategizing and planning."
But it has to be said that despite these bullish figures, skepticism about SOA is starting to gain voice, along with news of the first SOA casualties from the front line.
Source: Manufacturing & Logistics IT, http://www.logisticsit.com

For a number of years service-oriented architecture (SOA) has been widely promoted as a panacea to many of the problems industry is facing particularly the requirement to reduce costs and increase agility. Analysts, vendors and end users alike appear united in their enthusiasm for it. Butler Group, for example, tells us that only 3 percent of organizations have rejected SOA. And a recent survey by systems integrator Griffiths Waite found that 2008 is a critical year for SOA implementation, with 15 percent of organizations already running SOA and a much larger 38 percent progressing towards it. Of the 47 percent still "contemplating" it, Griffith Waite says, "evidence suggests these will (start to) move into strategizing and planning."
But it has to be said that despite these bullish figures, skepticism about SOA is starting to gain voice, along with news of the first SOA casualties from the front line.
Source: Manufacturing & Logistics IT, http://www.logisticsit.com