Executive Briefings

Stores May Be Prepared for Power Outage of a Day or Two - But Not for Almost Two Weeks

As Superstorm Sandy blew its devastating winds through much of the Eastern U.S. starting on Halloween, retailers had to deal with it just like everyone else. But few seemed to have anticipated the more than eight days - and more, in some cases - of outages, along with the gas shortages, closed roads, lack of food and water, plus the dead phone lines, lack of internet broadband access and dead cell towers.

Stores are used to outages of a few hours and maybe, during severe situations, maybe one day. The bad news: With global weirding (the term for the many strange weather patterns caused by global warming), there's a fine chance these week-plus outages may be something that has to be planned for. With that in mind, let's look at what some of the chains discovered when they could only exist via emergency generator.

Existing sometimes only via emergency generator, stores found it meant POS without network (no debit, no gift cards, no returns, no lookups) and few ways to tell customers what they couldn't do.

Note: You really don't want your associates repeatedly having to go out and bring back gallons of gasoline, especially when shortages and rationing are likely, making the fuel expensive and potentially unobtainable.

Source: Storefront Backtalk


Keywords: retail supply chain, supply chain risk management, business continuity planning, business interruption strategies

Stores are used to outages of a few hours and maybe, during severe situations, maybe one day. The bad news: With global weirding (the term for the many strange weather patterns caused by global warming), there's a fine chance these week-plus outages may be something that has to be planned for. With that in mind, let's look at what some of the chains discovered when they could only exist via emergency generator.

Existing sometimes only via emergency generator, stores found it meant POS without network (no debit, no gift cards, no returns, no lookups) and few ways to tell customers what they couldn't do.

Note: You really don't want your associates repeatedly having to go out and bring back gallons of gasoline, especially when shortages and rationing are likely, making the fuel expensive and potentially unobtainable.

Source: Storefront Backtalk


Keywords: retail supply chain, supply chain risk management, business continuity planning, business interruption strategies