Executive Briefings

Stuck With Cloud Provider That May Not Be Your Long-term Choice?

In 2010, when Netflix was still early into its shift from DVD rentals to online movies and shows, it started using Amazon Web Services, the retailer's cloud computing division. Now that Netflix streams 100 million-plus hours of video every day, it's sticking with Amazon partly because of Amazon's scale and features, and partly because switching vendors "would be a significant multi-year effort," says Yury Izrailevsky, Netflix's vice president for cloud and platform engineering.

All the major cloud providers - including Amazon, Salesforce.com, Microsoft and Google - use technology different enough so that switching from one to another would require customers to rewrite much of their software. (Jeremy King, chief technology officer of Wal-Mart Stores' e-commerce division, compares picking a cloud provider to staying at the Hotel California - "You can check out anytime you like, but you can never leave.") Still, in the next five years about one-third of companies using the cloud may either switch providers to get a lower price or more features, or add another provider to get servers closer to customers or have a backup should one company suffer a meltdown, says David Linthicum, a consultant who creates cloud applications for companies.

Read Full Article

All the major cloud providers - including Amazon, Salesforce.com, Microsoft and Google - use technology different enough so that switching from one to another would require customers to rewrite much of their software. (Jeremy King, chief technology officer of Wal-Mart Stores' e-commerce division, compares picking a cloud provider to staying at the Hotel California - "You can check out anytime you like, but you can never leave.") Still, in the next five years about one-third of companies using the cloud may either switch providers to get a lower price or more features, or add another provider to get servers closer to customers or have a backup should one company suffer a meltdown, says David Linthicum, a consultant who creates cloud applications for companies.

Read Full Article