Executive Briefings

Survey Seeks Views on 'Green Ship Technologies' in Asian Maritime Sector

Despite ships being by far the most efficient form of transport, there is growing concern about climate change, the environmental state of the world's oceans and the air quality close to major shipping routes and ports which has led to ever more stringent legislation on emissions to both sea and air.

As such, the Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology (IMarEST) together with the UK Science & Innovation Network (SIN) Southeast Asia are seeking opinions to investigate “Green Ship Technologies” within Asia.

To assist with this, all those involved in the shipping industry are invited to complete a survey accessed by clicking here. The survey should take no longer than three minutes to complete, and is aimed at gauging views on the "Green Agenda" from across the maritime sector.

"The 'Green Agenda' attempts to address environmental issues by introducing ship designs, equipment, products and operating procedures that reduce harmful emissions, but these measures often come at a cost to ship owners, operators and ultimately the end users of the goods carried by sea. However, there are also financial incentives introduced by administrations, such as Singapore, to encourage a positive environmental response" says Bev MacKenzie, technical and policy director at the IMarEST.

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As such, the Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology (IMarEST) together with the UK Science & Innovation Network (SIN) Southeast Asia are seeking opinions to investigate “Green Ship Technologies” within Asia.

To assist with this, all those involved in the shipping industry are invited to complete a survey accessed by clicking here. The survey should take no longer than three minutes to complete, and is aimed at gauging views on the "Green Agenda" from across the maritime sector.

"The 'Green Agenda' attempts to address environmental issues by introducing ship designs, equipment, products and operating procedures that reduce harmful emissions, but these measures often come at a cost to ship owners, operators and ultimately the end users of the goods carried by sea. However, there are also financial incentives introduced by administrations, such as Singapore, to encourage a positive environmental response" says Bev MacKenzie, technical and policy director at the IMarEST.

Read Full Article