Executive Briefings

The Human Factor Is the Crucial Element in Any Approach to Cargo Security

Supply chain security is not a 9/11-only phenomenon. Governments, non-government organizations, and the private sector been working to improve the global supply chain since the late 1990s.  The core objective was and is to know definitively what the cargo and its quantity really are and monitor its movement from origin to destination. There is a developing global consistency in the collection, storage and electronic transmission of trade and manifest data from the stuffing of the container at origin to the opening of the container at destination. However, although this is occurring, common sense tells us that the reality of really knowing with 100-percent accuracy the contents of the container is a matter of statistical probability.  This is due, as it is in all security and intelligence matters, to the human factor, often the lowest common denominator in security.

Read Full Article

Supply chain security is not a 9/11-only phenomenon. Governments, non-government organizations, and the private sector been working to improve the global supply chain since the late 1990s.  The core objective was and is to know definitively what the cargo and its quantity really are and monitor its movement from origin to destination. There is a developing global consistency in the collection, storage and electronic transmission of trade and manifest data from the stuffing of the container at origin to the opening of the container at destination. However, although this is occurring, common sense tells us that the reality of really knowing with 100-percent accuracy the contents of the container is a matter of statistical probability.  This is due, as it is in all security and intelligence matters, to the human factor, often the lowest common denominator in security.

Read Full Article