Executive Briefings

The Quest for 10-Minute Pizza Delivery

In a secret kitchen protected by tight security, Domino's Pizza development chef Stefaan Codron is cooking up a plan to make fast food even faster.

The Quest for 10-Minute Pizza Delivery

His goal: a pizza with guaranteed delivery of less than 10 minutes, including the time to bake the dough, crisp the cheese and transport it door to door. At present, Domino's says more than 60 percent of its Australian stores generally deliver in under 23 minutes, with some metropolitan stores much closer to the 10-minute goal.

But every second counts as food delivery, boosted by mobile tech, is growing rapidly across the globe. At Domino’s Pizza Enterprises Ltd., which operates Domino’s stores in Australia, Codron is heading the effort to maintain the brand’s competitive edge, especially against startups and third-party apps offering dozens of menu options and fast service with a few taps on a smartphone.

The push for faster food has marketers around the world testing robots, shaving seconds off online ordering and tinkering with faster-cooking ingredients. While some customers don’t mind waiting in hopes of a higher-quality meal, companies are chasing fast delivery times to grab attention and expand to more casual-dining opportunities down the line.

In the U.S., at least two delivery services have joined with British-Estonian firm Starship Technologies to test deliveries using autonomous robots that travel on sidewalks. Zume Pizza, a Mountain View, Calif., startup, uses robots to assemble pizzas in a warehouse, then bakes them in trucks roving around neighborhoods, waiting for orders.

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His goal: a pizza with guaranteed delivery of less than 10 minutes, including the time to bake the dough, crisp the cheese and transport it door to door. At present, Domino's says more than 60 percent of its Australian stores generally deliver in under 23 minutes, with some metropolitan stores much closer to the 10-minute goal.

But every second counts as food delivery, boosted by mobile tech, is growing rapidly across the globe. At Domino’s Pizza Enterprises Ltd., which operates Domino’s stores in Australia, Codron is heading the effort to maintain the brand’s competitive edge, especially against startups and third-party apps offering dozens of menu options and fast service with a few taps on a smartphone.

The push for faster food has marketers around the world testing robots, shaving seconds off online ordering and tinkering with faster-cooking ingredients. While some customers don’t mind waiting in hopes of a higher-quality meal, companies are chasing fast delivery times to grab attention and expand to more casual-dining opportunities down the line.

In the U.S., at least two delivery services have joined with British-Estonian firm Starship Technologies to test deliveries using autonomous robots that travel on sidewalks. Zume Pizza, a Mountain View, Calif., startup, uses robots to assemble pizzas in a warehouse, then bakes them in trucks roving around neighborhoods, waiting for orders.

Read Full Article

The Quest for 10-Minute Pizza Delivery