Executive Briefings

The Supply Chain e-Business Top 100

Presenting our first annual list of leading-edge vendors whose applications can power productivity improvement across your supply chain.

Welcome to the first Supply Chain e-Business Top 100 list of leading application vendors. The Top 100 has one basic purpose: To identify market-leading application vendors whose solutions squarely address the many supply-chain challenges facing business users today. We think this endeavor is important for our readers, who are deluged with sales pitches promising quick solutions to their problems, often from vendors they have never heard of. We hope this list can serve as a starting point for our readers in their evaluation process.

It is important to point out that the Supply Chain e-Business Top 100 is not a ranking or even a rating system. Such a task would be almost impossible since the range of supply-chain applications is so broad, the needs of users so diverse and the basis for evaluation so subjective.

No doubt, some vendors and users will take issue with our selection of companies. We have tried to make our selection process as fair as possible, so it reflects real-world awareness of the companies that are leading the supply-chain e-business revolution. If we have any bias, it is toward true, internet-based solutions that have been built for the web and which provide maximum benefit to trading and service partners throughout the supply chain. We believe that such an approach is the future for supply-chain applications.

Our methodology
We at Supply Chain e-Business take full responsibility for this list, but please note that we have developed it with help from dozens of consultants, analysts and users who have wide expertise in what solutions are available, what is leading-edge and what is most useful.
We have created this list by first including all the leading supply-chain solution vendors that we could pull together. This impressive list of more than 250 companies was whittled down to about 125 by a group of more than 20 users, consultants and analysts. We reached the final Top 100 with the help of advisors from such companies as Accenture, Deloitte Consulting, KPMG Consulting, ARC Advisory Group and Current Analysis. The process of reaching the final Top 100 was spirited to say the least. No company was included or excluded because of the evaluation of just one advisor.

The factors we considered in evaluating vendors and their applications include the following:
1. Proven record of driving drive bottom line supply-chain performance
2. Marketplace success measured by the number of implementations, revenue earned, number of transactions, etc.
3. Usability, ease of implementation and simplicity of integration
4. Financial viability
5. Innovation and functionality

Objective and subjective
While we have tried to make the selection process as quantitative as possible using a weighted average of these criteria, we ultimately could not adhere strictly to this approach for several reasons. There are so many vendors and applications available today that no one has in-depth knowledge of all solutions. To make matters even more difficult, new solutions and updated versions of existing ones are coming every day. Ultimately, evaluations end up being subjective because users look for different benefits in a product.

Who's on the list
Thus, companies appear on our list for several reasons. Most are relatively well established and have proven their ability to drive bottom-line performance. Some are just so widely used that they have become a standard in their space. To no one's surprise, our quantitative approach put these players on the list. But in an industry that is supposed to be about innovation, risk-taking and break-through technology we thought we had to include applications that stand out for other reasons. For example, we have included a number of exchanges and marketplaces. A few of these have earned strong usage and financial success, but most are still on the bleeding-edge of the e-business revolution. Not all of these marketplace applications will ultimately succeed in the supply-chain e-business arena, but we thought it was important to include several procurement and logistics marketplaces that stand out for their technology, business processes and entrepreneurship. We also have included a handful of solution providers whose products are barely out of the pilot stage. We have included them because we are impressed with their potential for solving important business problems, as well as with the functionality of their solution.

Functional balance
Another factor that guided our development of the Top 100 is balance. We wanted our list to represent vendors whose applications cover the broad range of supply-chain activities. The standard list of supply-chain activities has traditionally been put into four broad areas: planning, sourcing, manufacturing and delivery (or execution). We think there are two new categories - managing, which includes a growing list of inter-enterprise processes, and selling, which includes all the customer-facing tasks that support online selling and customer-service. The vendors in the Top 100 offer solutions in one or more of the following areas:

1. Planning:
• Advanced planning and scheduling
• Optimization
• Distribution planning
• Collaborative planning, forecasting and replenishment

2. Sourcing:
• Indirect or MRO e-procurement
• Direct material sourcing
• Supplier relationship management

3. Manufacturing:
• Product life cycle mgmnt.
• Enterprise asset mgmnt.
• Enterprise production mgmnt.
• Collaborative framework
• Supply-chain control
• Product development mgmnt.

4. Management:
• Supply-chain event mgmnt.
• Process management
• Supply-chain visibility
• End-to-end supply-chain suites

5. Execution:
• Fulfillment
• Logistics collaboration
• Transportation mgmnt.
• Transportation procurement
• Global trade management

6. Selling:
• E-commerce platforms
• Catalog management
• Order management
• Customer-relationship mgmnt.

Up and comers
Several trends became clear to us as a result of developing the Supply Chain Top 100. There is a large wave of new, cutting-edge vendors whose products are likely to change the traditional approach to supply chain management. Thus, products that have worked well in the past are not necessarily the ones that will meet tomorrow's challenges. Most likely, some of the most innovative solutions will come from upstart vendors that are not well known and do not yet have the marketplace success and financial backing that established vendors have.

We recognize that these rapid changes in the supply-chain application marketplace will quickly make our Top 100 list out of date. For this reason, we have added an additional list that we call the "Up and Comers in Supply Chain Applications." It includes 25 vendors whose products are either new, or are in the process of being significantly revamped, to the point they are likely to become leading-edge vendors.

Perhaps more important than the lists in this report are the analyses that follow. We asked leading experts from our Board of Advisors to provide detailed views on trends in the six sectors of supply-chain management they individually cover. They also provide commentary on the leading vendors in these sectors, how well these vendors are solving users' problems and which vendors they think are leading the way. We invite you to read their insightful commentary on the pages that follow. We thank these experts for their hard work and cooperation:

Jill Jenkins, Current Analysis;
Jim Kilpatrick, Deloitte Consulting;
Steve Gold, KPMG Consulting;
Jonathan W. Friedman and
Jonathan D. Whitaker, Accenture;
Adrian Gonzales, ARC Advisory
Group

Looking forward
We have learned quite a bit about the dynamic nature of supply-chain technology in compiling this report.

1. We know for certain that the Supply Chain e- Business Top 100 will look very different a year from now.

2. There will be consolidations among vendors, especially in emerging areas such as event management, inter-enterprise visibility, and customer relationship management.

3. Some vendors will simply disappear because their business model hasn't resonated with users. New vendors and applications will appear offering capabilities that we have not yet heard of.

4. The big, heavy-weight software vendors will take increasing interest in the supply-chain application market.

5. All vendors will be broadening their product mix, as well as the functional capabilities of their solutions to take in more supply-chain task.

6. The emphasis will be as much on sharing information and collaborative capabilities across the supply chain as on the base functionality of the application.

This year, we present the Supply Chain e-Business Top 100. We hope it is useful to our readers as a tool to help identify viable applications from among the many hundreds of supply-chain solutions that are promoting themselves in the marketplace.

Plan: Supply-Chain Planning Builds on Its Success
Source: Moving from Indirect to Direct Procurement
Manage: Supply-chain Management Outside the Four Walls
Make: E-manufacturing breaks down the factory walls
Execute: Supply-chain Execution from Supplier to Customer
Sell: Sell-side Solutions Close the Loop With Customers

The Supply Chain e-Business Top 100
Company NameCategories
3Plex
Adexa
Agile
Ariba
Arzoon
Asera
Aspen Technology
Atlas Commerce
Baan
Blue Martini
BridgePoint
Broadvision
Camstar
CAPS Logistics
Carrier Point
Catalyst
Categoric
Celarix
ClearCross
ClickCommerce
ClickLogistics
Commerce One
Corcentric
Cyclone Commerce
DataSweep
Demand Management
Descartes Systems
Electron Economy
Elogex
EXE Technologies
FreeMarkets
Freightquote
Frontstep (formerly Symix)
Global Freight Exchange
G-Log
GT Nexus
HighJump
i2 Technologies

IBM (Websphere)
ICG Commerce
IFS
Industri Matematik
Intentia
InterBiz
Int'l Business Systems (IBS)
Irista
Ironside
J.D. Edwards
Kewill
Lawson Software
Lean Logistics
Lipro
Logility
Logistics.com
Made2Manage
Manhattan Associates
Manugistics
Marconi
MatrixOne
McHugh
Microsoft
MRO Software
Neomodal
NextLinx
Nistevo
NTE
Onyx
Optimum Logistics
Optum
Oracle
PeopleSoft
Prescient
Provia
QAD
Qiva
Retek
RightFreight
ROI Systems
SAP

Savi
SCT
SeeCommerce
Siebel
ShipLogix
Syncra Systems
SynQuest
Tecsys
Tilion
Transentric
Transplace
Transportation.com
Vastera
Vertex Interactive
Verticore
Viewlocity
Vigilance
Webango
WebModal
webPlan
Yantra
Execute
Plan, Manage
Source, Make
Source, Sell
Execute
Sell
Plan
Source, Sell
Plan, Manage, Sell
Sell
Manage, Execute
Sell
Make
Execute
Execute
Execute
Manage
Manage, Execute
Execute
Sell
Execute
Source, Sell
Execute
Sell
Make
Plan, Manage
Manage, Execute
Manage, Execute
Execute
Execute
Source
Execute
Plan
Execute
Execute
Execute
Execute
Plan, Source, Manage, Make, Execute, Sell
Sell
Source
Make
Execute
Manage, Make
Manage, Sell
Plan, Sell
Execute
Sell
Plan, Manage
Manage, Make, Execute, Sell
Source, Manage, Sell
Execute
Make
Plan
Manage, Execute
Manage, Make
Execute
Plan, Source, Manage
Manage
Source, Make
Execute
Manage, Sell
Source, Make
Execute
Execute
Execute
Execute
Sell
Execute
Execute, Sell
Plan, Source, Manage, Sell
Plan, Manage, Sell
Plan
Execute
Manage, Make
Execute
Execute
Execute
Plan, Manage, Make
Plan, Source, Manage, Make, Execute, Sell
Manage
Plan
Manage
Sell
Execute
Plan
Plan
Plan, Execute, Sell
Manage
Manage, Execute
Execute
Execute
Execute
Execute
Manage
Manage
Manage
Source, Sell
Execute
Plan
Manage, Execute, Sell



Up and Comers in Supply-chain Applications
Company NameCategories
Alventive
Calico
Cohera
Digital Freight
E3
eBizChain
eBreviate
Emptoris
Fourth Channel
Freightlist
Frictionless Commerce
Healy Hudson
IPNet Solutions
LIS
Log-Net
Lombardi
NexPrise
Saltare
SAQQARA
SDRC
Supplylinks
Verian Technologies
Vignette
Vizional
WorldChain
Source
Sell
Sell
Execute
Source
Manage
Source
Source
Sell
Execute
Source
Source
Source, Sell
Execute
Execute
Plan, Manage, Make, Sell
Source, Make
Manage
Sell
Make
Execute
Source
Sell
Manage
Manage, Execute

Welcome to the first Supply Chain e-Business Top 100 list of leading application vendors. The Top 100 has one basic purpose: To identify market-leading application vendors whose solutions squarely address the many supply-chain challenges facing business users today. We think this endeavor is important for our readers, who are deluged with sales pitches promising quick solutions to their problems, often from vendors they have never heard of. We hope this list can serve as a starting point for our readers in their evaluation process.

It is important to point out that the Supply Chain e-Business Top 100 is not a ranking or even a rating system. Such a task would be almost impossible since the range of supply-chain applications is so broad, the needs of users so diverse and the basis for evaluation so subjective.

No doubt, some vendors and users will take issue with our selection of companies. We have tried to make our selection process as fair as possible, so it reflects real-world awareness of the companies that are leading the supply-chain e-business revolution. If we have any bias, it is toward true, internet-based solutions that have been built for the web and which provide maximum benefit to trading and service partners throughout the supply chain. We believe that such an approach is the future for supply-chain applications.

Our methodology
We at Supply Chain e-Business take full responsibility for this list, but please note that we have developed it with help from dozens of consultants, analysts and users who have wide expertise in what solutions are available, what is leading-edge and what is most useful.
We have created this list by first including all the leading supply-chain solution vendors that we could pull together. This impressive list of more than 250 companies was whittled down to about 125 by a group of more than 20 users, consultants and analysts. We reached the final Top 100 with the help of advisors from such companies as Accenture, Deloitte Consulting, KPMG Consulting, ARC Advisory Group and Current Analysis. The process of reaching the final Top 100 was spirited to say the least. No company was included or excluded because of the evaluation of just one advisor.

The factors we considered in evaluating vendors and their applications include the following:
1. Proven record of driving drive bottom line supply-chain performance
2. Marketplace success measured by the number of implementations, revenue earned, number of transactions, etc.
3. Usability, ease of implementation and simplicity of integration
4. Financial viability
5. Innovation and functionality

Objective and subjective
While we have tried to make the selection process as quantitative as possible using a weighted average of these criteria, we ultimately could not adhere strictly to this approach for several reasons. There are so many vendors and applications available today that no one has in-depth knowledge of all solutions. To make matters even more difficult, new solutions and updated versions of existing ones are coming every day. Ultimately, evaluations end up being subjective because users look for different benefits in a product.

Who's on the list
Thus, companies appear on our list for several reasons. Most are relatively well established and have proven their ability to drive bottom-line performance. Some are just so widely used that they have become a standard in their space. To no one's surprise, our quantitative approach put these players on the list. But in an industry that is supposed to be about innovation, risk-taking and break-through technology we thought we had to include applications that stand out for other reasons. For example, we have included a number of exchanges and marketplaces. A few of these have earned strong usage and financial success, but most are still on the bleeding-edge of the e-business revolution. Not all of these marketplace applications will ultimately succeed in the supply-chain e-business arena, but we thought it was important to include several procurement and logistics marketplaces that stand out for their technology, business processes and entrepreneurship. We also have included a handful of solution providers whose products are barely out of the pilot stage. We have included them because we are impressed with their potential for solving important business problems, as well as with the functionality of their solution.

Functional balance
Another factor that guided our development of the Top 100 is balance. We wanted our list to represent vendors whose applications cover the broad range of supply-chain activities. The standard list of supply-chain activities has traditionally been put into four broad areas: planning, sourcing, manufacturing and delivery (or execution). We think there are two new categories - managing, which includes a growing list of inter-enterprise processes, and selling, which includes all the customer-facing tasks that support online selling and customer-service. The vendors in the Top 100 offer solutions in one or more of the following areas:

1. Planning:
• Advanced planning and scheduling
• Optimization
• Distribution planning
• Collaborative planning, forecasting and replenishment

2. Sourcing:
• Indirect or MRO e-procurement
• Direct material sourcing
• Supplier relationship management

3. Manufacturing:
• Product life cycle mgmnt.
• Enterprise asset mgmnt.
• Enterprise production mgmnt.
• Collaborative framework
• Supply-chain control
• Product development mgmnt.

4. Management:
• Supply-chain event mgmnt.
• Process management
• Supply-chain visibility
• End-to-end supply-chain suites

5. Execution:
• Fulfillment
• Logistics collaboration
• Transportation mgmnt.
• Transportation procurement
• Global trade management

6. Selling:
• E-commerce platforms
• Catalog management
• Order management
• Customer-relationship mgmnt.

Up and comers
Several trends became clear to us as a result of developing the Supply Chain Top 100. There is a large wave of new, cutting-edge vendors whose products are likely to change the traditional approach to supply chain management. Thus, products that have worked well in the past are not necessarily the ones that will meet tomorrow's challenges. Most likely, some of the most innovative solutions will come from upstart vendors that are not well known and do not yet have the marketplace success and financial backing that established vendors have.

We recognize that these rapid changes in the supply-chain application marketplace will quickly make our Top 100 list out of date. For this reason, we have added an additional list that we call the "Up and Comers in Supply Chain Applications." It includes 25 vendors whose products are either new, or are in the process of being significantly revamped, to the point they are likely to become leading-edge vendors.

Perhaps more important than the lists in this report are the analyses that follow. We asked leading experts from our Board of Advisors to provide detailed views on trends in the six sectors of supply-chain management they individually cover. They also provide commentary on the leading vendors in these sectors, how well these vendors are solving users' problems and which vendors they think are leading the way. We invite you to read their insightful commentary on the pages that follow. We thank these experts for their hard work and cooperation:

Jill Jenkins, Current Analysis;
Jim Kilpatrick, Deloitte Consulting;
Steve Gold, KPMG Consulting;
Jonathan W. Friedman and
Jonathan D. Whitaker, Accenture;
Adrian Gonzales, ARC Advisory
Group

Looking forward
We have learned quite a bit about the dynamic nature of supply-chain technology in compiling this report.

1. We know for certain that the Supply Chain e- Business Top 100 will look very different a year from now.

2. There will be consolidations among vendors, especially in emerging areas such as event management, inter-enterprise visibility, and customer relationship management.

3. Some vendors will simply disappear because their business model hasn't resonated with users. New vendors and applications will appear offering capabilities that we have not yet heard of.

4. The big, heavy-weight software vendors will take increasing interest in the supply-chain application market.

5. All vendors will be broadening their product mix, as well as the functional capabilities of their solutions to take in more supply-chain task.

6. The emphasis will be as much on sharing information and collaborative capabilities across the supply chain as on the base functionality of the application.

This year, we present the Supply Chain e-Business Top 100. We hope it is useful to our readers as a tool to help identify viable applications from among the many hundreds of supply-chain solutions that are promoting themselves in the marketplace.

Plan: Supply-Chain Planning Builds on Its Success
Source: Moving from Indirect to Direct Procurement
Manage: Supply-chain Management Outside the Four Walls
Make: E-manufacturing breaks down the factory walls
Execute: Supply-chain Execution from Supplier to Customer
Sell: Sell-side Solutions Close the Loop With Customers

The Supply Chain e-Business Top 100
Company NameCategories
3Plex
Adexa
Agile
Ariba
Arzoon
Asera
Aspen Technology
Atlas Commerce
Baan
Blue Martini
BridgePoint
Broadvision
Camstar
CAPS Logistics
Carrier Point
Catalyst
Categoric
Celarix
ClearCross
ClickCommerce
ClickLogistics
Commerce One
Corcentric
Cyclone Commerce
DataSweep
Demand Management
Descartes Systems
Electron Economy
Elogex
EXE Technologies
FreeMarkets
Freightquote
Frontstep (formerly Symix)
Global Freight Exchange
G-Log
GT Nexus
HighJump
i2 Technologies

IBM (Websphere)
ICG Commerce
IFS
Industri Matematik
Intentia
InterBiz
Int'l Business Systems (IBS)
Irista
Ironside
J.D. Edwards
Kewill
Lawson Software
Lean Logistics
Lipro
Logility
Logistics.com
Made2Manage
Manhattan Associates
Manugistics
Marconi
MatrixOne
McHugh
Microsoft
MRO Software
Neomodal
NextLinx
Nistevo
NTE
Onyx
Optimum Logistics
Optum
Oracle
PeopleSoft
Prescient
Provia
QAD
Qiva
Retek
RightFreight
ROI Systems
SAP

Savi
SCT
SeeCommerce
Siebel
ShipLogix
Syncra Systems
SynQuest
Tecsys
Tilion
Transentric
Transplace
Transportation.com
Vastera
Vertex Interactive
Verticore
Viewlocity
Vigilance
Webango
WebModal
webPlan
Yantra
Execute
Plan, Manage
Source, Make
Source, Sell
Execute
Sell
Plan
Source, Sell
Plan, Manage, Sell
Sell
Manage, Execute
Sell
Make
Execute
Execute
Execute
Manage
Manage, Execute
Execute
Sell
Execute
Source, Sell
Execute
Sell
Make
Plan, Manage
Manage, Execute
Manage, Execute
Execute
Execute
Source
Execute
Plan
Execute
Execute
Execute
Execute
Plan, Source, Manage, Make, Execute, Sell
Sell
Source
Make
Execute
Manage, Make
Manage, Sell
Plan, Sell
Execute
Sell
Plan, Manage
Manage, Make, Execute, Sell
Source, Manage, Sell
Execute
Make
Plan
Manage, Execute
Manage, Make
Execute
Plan, Source, Manage
Manage
Source, Make
Execute
Manage, Sell
Source, Make
Execute
Execute
Execute
Execute
Sell
Execute
Execute, Sell
Plan, Source, Manage, Sell
Plan, Manage, Sell
Plan
Execute
Manage, Make
Execute
Execute
Execute
Plan, Manage, Make
Plan, Source, Manage, Make, Execute, Sell
Manage
Plan
Manage
Sell
Execute
Plan
Plan
Plan, Execute, Sell
Manage
Manage, Execute
Execute
Execute
Execute
Execute
Manage
Manage
Manage
Source, Sell
Execute
Plan
Manage, Execute, Sell



Up and Comers in Supply-chain Applications
Company NameCategories
Alventive
Calico
Cohera
Digital Freight
E3
eBizChain
eBreviate
Emptoris
Fourth Channel
Freightlist
Frictionless Commerce
Healy Hudson
IPNet Solutions
LIS
Log-Net
Lombardi
NexPrise
Saltare
SAQQARA
SDRC
Supplylinks
Verian Technologies
Vignette
Vizional
WorldChain
Source
Sell
Sell
Execute
Source
Manage
Source
Source
Sell
Execute
Source
Source
Source, Sell
Execute
Execute
Plan, Manage, Make, Sell
Source, Make
Manage
Sell
Make
Execute
Source
Sell
Manage
Manage, Execute