Executive Briefings

The 'Uberfication' of Home Delivery

Uber and its rivals have transformed the world of personal transportation. Now the concept is beginning to have an impact on the delivery of product ordered over the internet. Lior Sion, chief technology officer of Bringg, traces the progress of the trend.

"People are tired of not knowing when something is coming to them," says Sion. Yet he believes the problem will disappear within two to three years. The reason is the extension of the personal-transportation option, pioneered by Uber for passengers, to packages.

An Uber-like model will give customers transparency as to when their packages will arrive. Sion believes the market is dictating its development. "People are more and more expecting same-day and one-hour service," he says. "And they expect to be part of the experience."

An urban setting, because of its high concentration of population, is likely the best place to develop the service. But even in less-crowded areas, it could provide customers with complete driver visibility and delivery within a matter of hours, Sion says.

He believes this service-intensive approach will become essential to the survival of retailers, much as the creation of the internet eventually dictated that every company would have a website. "The concept is changing the experience for the customer," he says.

Sion isn't sure whether an enhanced delivery offering like that of Bringg would compete with Amazon, Google and other established players, or work with them. "Amazon is a possible customer," he says, "but it’s not our target."

Regardless of who is offering it, an on-demand service platform "equates with customer retention," Sion says. "It's quite an amazing change, when you think about it."

To view the video in its entirety, click here

"People are tired of not knowing when something is coming to them," says Sion. Yet he believes the problem will disappear within two to three years. The reason is the extension of the personal-transportation option, pioneered by Uber for passengers, to packages.

An Uber-like model will give customers transparency as to when their packages will arrive. Sion believes the market is dictating its development. "People are more and more expecting same-day and one-hour service," he says. "And they expect to be part of the experience."

An urban setting, because of its high concentration of population, is likely the best place to develop the service. But even in less-crowded areas, it could provide customers with complete driver visibility and delivery within a matter of hours, Sion says.

He believes this service-intensive approach will become essential to the survival of retailers, much as the creation of the internet eventually dictated that every company would have a website. "The concept is changing the experience for the customer," he says.

Sion isn't sure whether an enhanced delivery offering like that of Bringg would compete with Amazon, Google and other established players, or work with them. "Amazon is a possible customer," he says, "but it’s not our target."

Regardless of who is offering it, an on-demand service platform "equates with customer retention," Sion says. "It's quite an amazing change, when you think about it."

To view the video in its entirety, click here