Executive Briefings

This Company Is Implanting Microchips in Its Workers

You'll never forget your work badge if it's implanted in your flesh.

This Company Is Implanting Microchips in Its Workers

That's the thinking at Three Square Market, a Wisconsin vending machine software firm offering to inject microchips into employees so they can open office doors, log in to computers, share business cards and even buy snacks with just of a wave of the hand.

Chief Executive Todd Westby spoke with The Times about his embrace of Radio Frequency ID chips and his company's entirely voluntary Aug. 1 implanting "chipping" event. This interview has been edited for clarity and continuity.

How does one get ‘chipped’?
It’s like an ear piercing. The procedure isn’t surgical; the chip is injected. A licensed professional puts it in the skin between the pointer finger and thumb. If you don’t want it anymore, you can remove it like a sliver.

Tweaking the human body seems like a big departure from vending machines. Why is your company experimenting with biohacking?
It wasn’t something we went looking for. We were working over in Europe and one of our operators had the chip technology.... And then the idea of bringing that technology to our company grew from there. We are a tech company so I don’t think anyone was surprised by it — especially because it can be used with our technology.

Chipping is like self-driving cars, who’d have thought 15 years ago those would be around?

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That's the thinking at Three Square Market, a Wisconsin vending machine software firm offering to inject microchips into employees so they can open office doors, log in to computers, share business cards and even buy snacks with just of a wave of the hand.

Chief Executive Todd Westby spoke with The Times about his embrace of Radio Frequency ID chips and his company's entirely voluntary Aug. 1 implanting "chipping" event. This interview has been edited for clarity and continuity.

How does one get ‘chipped’?
It’s like an ear piercing. The procedure isn’t surgical; the chip is injected. A licensed professional puts it in the skin between the pointer finger and thumb. If you don’t want it anymore, you can remove it like a sliver.

Tweaking the human body seems like a big departure from vending machines. Why is your company experimenting with biohacking?
It wasn’t something we went looking for. We were working over in Europe and one of our operators had the chip technology.... And then the idea of bringing that technology to our company grew from there. We are a tech company so I don’t think anyone was surprised by it — especially because it can be used with our technology.

Chipping is like self-driving cars, who’d have thought 15 years ago those would be around?

Read Full Article

This Company Is Implanting Microchips in Its Workers