Executive Briefings

Three Ports Inaugurate Secure Freight Initiative, With 100-Percent Screening of Radiological Materials

The Secure Freight Initiative (SFI) is underway, having been implemented at the Southhampton Container Terminals in the United Kingdom, Port Qasim in Pakistan, and Puerto Cortez in Honduras. The ports have begun scanning all ocean containers destined for the U.S. for nuclear or other radiological materials. The requirement is part of the Security and Accountability for Every (SAFE) Port Act of 2006, which sets up a program that combines non-intrusive inspection with radiation-detection technology. Results are conveyed for analysis to officials at U.S. Customs and Border Protection's (CBP's) National Targeting Center. "This initiative advances a comprehensive strategy to secure the global supply chain and substantially limits the potential for terrorist threats," said Jayson P. Ahern, deputy commissioner of CBP. Phase 1 of the program includes scanning on a limited-capacity basis at four additional ports: the Brani terminal in Singapore; Gamman terminal in Busan, South Korea; Modern Terminal in Hong Kong, and Salalah, Oman. The U.S. contributed around $60m to the Secure Freight Initiative, for the installation of scanning systems and communications infrastructure. The U.S. government is committed to implementing 100-percent scanning "in a logical and practical manner that does not adversely affect global trade," CBP said.
http://www.cbp.gov

The Secure Freight Initiative (SFI) is underway, having been implemented at the Southhampton Container Terminals in the United Kingdom, Port Qasim in Pakistan, and Puerto Cortez in Honduras. The ports have begun scanning all ocean containers destined for the U.S. for nuclear or other radiological materials. The requirement is part of the Security and Accountability for Every (SAFE) Port Act of 2006, which sets up a program that combines non-intrusive inspection with radiation-detection technology. Results are conveyed for analysis to officials at U.S. Customs and Border Protection's (CBP's) National Targeting Center. "This initiative advances a comprehensive strategy to secure the global supply chain and substantially limits the potential for terrorist threats," said Jayson P. Ahern, deputy commissioner of CBP. Phase 1 of the program includes scanning on a limited-capacity basis at four additional ports: the Brani terminal in Singapore; Gamman terminal in Busan, South Korea; Modern Terminal in Hong Kong, and Salalah, Oman. The U.S. contributed around $60m to the Secure Freight Initiative, for the installation of scanning systems and communications infrastructure. The U.S. government is committed to implementing 100-percent scanning "in a logical and practical manner that does not adversely affect global trade," CBP said.
http://www.cbp.gov