Executive Briefings

Travel Ban Won't Hit the U.S. Economy This Year, Economists Say

The U.S. economy should be able to weather President Donald Trump's temporary travel ban, economists say, though any broadening of immigration and visa restrictions could hurt the labor force and productivity.

Two-thirds of economists surveyed by Bloomberg said the ban, which has for the moment been temporarily suspended by the courts, will have "little to no effect" on 2017 gross domestic product. Nine said it would have a moderately negative impact and only one said it would have a significantly negative effect.

Trump issued the executive order on Jan. 27, temporarily banning immigration from seven Muslim-majority countries and blocking for 120 days all refugees in a bid to keep potential terrorists from entering the U.S.

Many of the economists surveyed simply don't see the ban "sticking," in the words of Mikhail Melnik from Kennesaw State University in Georgia. The ban already has been put through the judicial wringer, having been granted a temporary delay by a judge in Seattle earlier this month and facing several other lawsuits around the country.

"It is doubtful that the ban will stick," Melnik said. "But if it does, it will have a rather limited economic impact."

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Two-thirds of economists surveyed by Bloomberg said the ban, which has for the moment been temporarily suspended by the courts, will have "little to no effect" on 2017 gross domestic product. Nine said it would have a moderately negative impact and only one said it would have a significantly negative effect.

Trump issued the executive order on Jan. 27, temporarily banning immigration from seven Muslim-majority countries and blocking for 120 days all refugees in a bid to keep potential terrorists from entering the U.S.

Many of the economists surveyed simply don't see the ban "sticking," in the words of Mikhail Melnik from Kennesaw State University in Georgia. The ban already has been put through the judicial wringer, having been granted a temporary delay by a judge in Seattle earlier this month and facing several other lawsuits around the country.

"It is doubtful that the ban will stick," Melnik said. "But if it does, it will have a rather limited economic impact."

Read Full Article