Executive Briefings

Truck Association Urges Action on Drug Testing

The American Trucking Associations has urged Congress to authorize and fund a centralized clearinghouse for positive drug and alcohol testing results of commercial drivers to ensure that motor carrier employers are aware of previous positive test results during the hiring process. This is one of several steps that ATA says will help the trucking industry keep drug and alcohol abusers off the road and improve safety on the nation's highways.
The association also asked Congress to encourage the Department of Transportation to implement an incentive-based random testing rate requirement and to focus on motor carriers with above average positive test results. Recommendations further included banning the manufacture, sale and distribution of products that help drivers evade drug tests and penalizing those who use them; directing the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and the U.S. DOT to initiate a rulemaking that allows the testing of hair as an alternative to urine, and improving oversight of specimen collection facilities and practices.
While ATA and the trucking industry do not condone any level of drug abuse among the driver population, the percentage has remained around 2 percent since required testing began in 1995. According to government reports, drug abuse in the trucking industry, as measured by a percentage of positive test results, has remained around 2 percent since required testing began in 1995, which is less than half of that found in the general work force.
www.truckline.com

The American Trucking Associations has urged Congress to authorize and fund a centralized clearinghouse for positive drug and alcohol testing results of commercial drivers to ensure that motor carrier employers are aware of previous positive test results during the hiring process. This is one of several steps that ATA says will help the trucking industry keep drug and alcohol abusers off the road and improve safety on the nation's highways.
The association also asked Congress to encourage the Department of Transportation to implement an incentive-based random testing rate requirement and to focus on motor carriers with above average positive test results. Recommendations further included banning the manufacture, sale and distribution of products that help drivers evade drug tests and penalizing those who use them; directing the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and the U.S. DOT to initiate a rulemaking that allows the testing of hair as an alternative to urine, and improving oversight of specimen collection facilities and practices.
While ATA and the trucking industry do not condone any level of drug abuse among the driver population, the percentage has remained around 2 percent since required testing began in 1995. According to government reports, drug abuse in the trucking industry, as measured by a percentage of positive test results, has remained around 2 percent since required testing began in 1995, which is less than half of that found in the general work force.
www.truckline.com