Executive Briefings

TSA Finalizes Its Airfreight Screening Ruling

The U.S. Transportation Security Administration has announced the execution of its Final Rule for the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007. In addition to finalizing the TSA's interim final rule (IFR) on airfreight security, this resolution enables entities other than airlines to screen cargo transported on passenger planes.

The IFR, which was implemented in September 2009, created the basis for the TSA's certified cargo screening program (CSSP), lauded worldwide as a success. As a way to expedite the screening mandates outlined in the 9/11 Act, the CSSP allows entities that have met rigorous standards to inspect freight. Prior to this, only airlines were authorized to screen belly-hold cargo.

Now the TSA is taking this concept one step further and allowing airfreight entities to apply to become certified cargo screening facilities (CCSFs). As designated CCSFs, cargo companies must adhere to stringent chain-of-custody requirements and "implement a multi-layered security program that includes appointing security coordinators, strict access controls and vetting of key personnel, TSA officials said.

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The U.S. Transportation Security Administration has announced the execution of its Final Rule for the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007. In addition to finalizing the TSA's interim final rule (IFR) on airfreight security, this resolution enables entities other than airlines to screen cargo transported on passenger planes.

The IFR, which was implemented in September 2009, created the basis for the TSA's certified cargo screening program (CSSP), lauded worldwide as a success. As a way to expedite the screening mandates outlined in the 9/11 Act, the CSSP allows entities that have met rigorous standards to inspect freight. Prior to this, only airlines were authorized to screen belly-hold cargo.

Now the TSA is taking this concept one step further and allowing airfreight entities to apply to become certified cargo screening facilities (CCSFs). As designated CCSFs, cargo companies must adhere to stringent chain-of-custody requirements and "implement a multi-layered security program that includes appointing security coordinators, strict access controls and vetting of key personnel, TSA officials said.

Read Full Article