Executive Briefings

University of Maryland May Help State Businesses with RFID

A business development division within the University of Maryland plans to launch a program to help state companies assess whether radio frequency identification (RFID) is right for them. RFID chips, which can emit detectable signals, are already being used to pay tolls and track inventory and supplies at various vendors, and the school's extension service thinks local businesses may benefit from the technology as well.
"These tags are actually talking to a computer without manual intervention," cutting down on labor costs, says Paul Vinikoor, a certified RFID technologist, electrical engineer and manager of the university's Maryland Technology Extension Service (MTES), which provides business assistance to state companies.
Through MTES, Vinikoor is launching the state business-assessment program. It will be free for the first six to 10 applicants "to get the ball rolling," he said, and likely become a paid service later on.
"This is to make companies in the state more productive. We want companies to make more money," Vinikoor says. "The bottom line is if they make more money, they're going to pay more taxes ... and RFID can help them improve productivity."
Source: CRM Buyer, http://crmbuyer.com

A business development division within the University of Maryland plans to launch a program to help state companies assess whether radio frequency identification (RFID) is right for them. RFID chips, which can emit detectable signals, are already being used to pay tolls and track inventory and supplies at various vendors, and the school's extension service thinks local businesses may benefit from the technology as well.
"These tags are actually talking to a computer without manual intervention," cutting down on labor costs, says Paul Vinikoor, a certified RFID technologist, electrical engineer and manager of the university's Maryland Technology Extension Service (MTES), which provides business assistance to state companies.
Through MTES, Vinikoor is launching the state business-assessment program. It will be free for the first six to 10 applicants "to get the ball rolling," he said, and likely become a paid service later on.
"This is to make companies in the state more productive. We want companies to make more money," Vinikoor says. "The bottom line is if they make more money, they're going to pay more taxes ... and RFID can help them improve productivity."
Source: CRM Buyer, http://crmbuyer.com