Executive Briefings

U.S. 'Most Competitive' in IT, But Its Lead Is Vulnerable

Recession or no, when it comes to running a tech company the U.S. is still the best place to do business, according to a new study released by the Economist Intelligence Unit.

Commissioned by the Business Software Alliance, a trade organization that represents the software industry, the study analyzes data on 66 countries to determine which have the most competitive information technology sectors. Now in its third year, it examines such variables as a country's overall business climate; the pervasiveness of its tech infrastructure; the strength and transparency of its legal system; and the availability of a workforce that is both well-educated and technologically literate.

Home to some of the world's most recognizable tech companies, such as IBM, Oracle, Intel, Apple, Hewlett-Packard and Google, the U.S. has topped the survey every year, but the country's predominance is vulnerable in key ways. "We see a number of factors where the U.S. is not in the lead," says Robert Holeyman, CEO of the BSA.

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Recession or no, when it comes to running a tech company the U.S. is still the best place to do business, according to a new study released by the Economist Intelligence Unit.

Commissioned by the Business Software Alliance, a trade organization that represents the software industry, the study analyzes data on 66 countries to determine which have the most competitive information technology sectors. Now in its third year, it examines such variables as a country's overall business climate; the pervasiveness of its tech infrastructure; the strength and transparency of its legal system; and the availability of a workforce that is both well-educated and technologically literate.

Home to some of the world's most recognizable tech companies, such as IBM, Oracle, Intel, Apple, Hewlett-Packard and Google, the U.S. has topped the survey every year, but the country's predominance is vulnerable in key ways. "We see a number of factors where the U.S. is not in the lead," says Robert Holeyman, CEO of the BSA.

Read Full Article