Executive Briefings

Vendors Eye Government's Growing Interest in Cloud Computing

The move to adopt cloud technologies by federal agencies has opened up IT opportunities for many vendors. As momentum builds within these agencies to explore the cloud, support is coming from other quarters.

Recently, Rep. Gerry Connolly (D-Va.) said, "Cloud computing offers the federal government several potential benefits, including savings related to economies of scale, reduced capital investments, and fewer service disruptions due to resiliency of the cloud compared to a single server or data center."

In a memo to the chairman of the House Oversight Committee's subcommittee on Technology, Information Policy and Intergovernmental Relations, Connolly said the subcommittee should hold hearings and pursue legislation that would require federal agencies to use cloud computing rather than data centers "unless the cost is higher." Connolly wants to enable agencies to consolidate risk and authorization approvals for shifting to cloud data storage and processing.

As federal cloud conversions unfold, it appears that multiple vendors are getting a piece of the action. That's not to suggest there is an organized effort to share the wealth among various IT providers -- it's just the way procurement efforts have turned out.

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The move to adopt cloud technologies by federal agencies has opened up IT opportunities for many vendors. As momentum builds within these agencies to explore the cloud, support is coming from other quarters.

Recently, Rep. Gerry Connolly (D-Va.) said, "Cloud computing offers the federal government several potential benefits, including savings related to economies of scale, reduced capital investments, and fewer service disruptions due to resiliency of the cloud compared to a single server or data center."

In a memo to the chairman of the House Oversight Committee's subcommittee on Technology, Information Policy and Intergovernmental Relations, Connolly said the subcommittee should hold hearings and pursue legislation that would require federal agencies to use cloud computing rather than data centers "unless the cost is higher." Connolly wants to enable agencies to consolidate risk and authorization approvals for shifting to cloud data storage and processing.

As federal cloud conversions unfold, it appears that multiple vendors are getting a piece of the action. That's not to suggest there is an organized effort to share the wealth among various IT providers -- it's just the way procurement efforts have turned out.

Read Full Article