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VW Dropped From Trusted-Cargo Program Over Cheating Scandal

The emissions-cheating scandal that has cost Volkswagen AG more than $20bn has also made it harder to import its cars to the U.S.

VW Dropped From Trusted-Cargo Program Over Cheating Scandal

Violations uncovered by the investigation into VW's emissions cheating prompted U.S. officials in 2016 to remove the company from a trusted-cargo program overseen by U.S. Customs and Border Protection, said Nicole Navas, a Justice Department spokeswoman.

As a result, VW vehicles and engines imported to the U.S. face a greater risk of lengthy delays at border crossings.

The program, called the Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism, offers perks to companies such as front-of-line inspections and fewer searches in exchange for agreeing to bolster the security of their cargo and supply chains. Some 11,400 firms participate.

The removal means that VW must seek readmission to rejoin the program, Navas said last week, confirming for the first time that the company had been removed from the program in March.

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Violations uncovered by the investigation into VW's emissions cheating prompted U.S. officials in 2016 to remove the company from a trusted-cargo program overseen by U.S. Customs and Border Protection, said Nicole Navas, a Justice Department spokeswoman.

As a result, VW vehicles and engines imported to the U.S. face a greater risk of lengthy delays at border crossings.

The program, called the Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism, offers perks to companies such as front-of-line inspections and fewer searches in exchange for agreeing to bolster the security of their cargo and supply chains. Some 11,400 firms participate.

The removal means that VW must seek readmission to rejoin the program, Navas said last week, confirming for the first time that the company had been removed from the program in March.

Read Full Article

VW Dropped From Trusted-Cargo Program Over Cheating Scandal