Executive Briefings

Weed Control: Colorado to Require RFID Tech to Monitor Marijuana Supply Chain

Hundreds of recreational marijuana shops are slated to open in Colorado on Jan. 1. Once that happens, every package of buds or processed products, such as marijuana-laced brownies, will have an RFID tag attached to it, intended to help the state regulate product and ensure that it comes from authorized sources.

In July 2011, Colorado's Department of Revenue issued medical marijuana regulations requiring that the pot plants' and products' status and whereabouts be recorded throughout the supply chain. The agency also indicated that the state will eventually require the use of EPC Gen 2 ultrahigh-frequency (UHF) RFID tags to authenticate and identify each product or plant. The rules resulted in the creation of what the state calls Marijuana Inventory Tracking Solutions (MITS)"”a system that the Department of Revenue's Marijuana Enforcement Division intends to use to track the pot from the greenhouse in which it is grown to the store where the drug is sold. MITS consists of software developed by Florida technology company Franwell.

The MITS software, residing on Colorado's database, is designed to track each plant or package"”beginning with the moment a marijuana cutting is first planted. To monitor what each cannabis plant or product consists of, as well as where it originated, the state is employing EPC Gen 2 UHF RFID tags supplied by Franwell. Marijuana growers must purchase these tags"”available in various forms, including as a hangtag or an adhesive label"”and attach them to the plants themselves, or to packages of processed marijuana.

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In July 2011, Colorado's Department of Revenue issued medical marijuana regulations requiring that the pot plants' and products' status and whereabouts be recorded throughout the supply chain. The agency also indicated that the state will eventually require the use of EPC Gen 2 ultrahigh-frequency (UHF) RFID tags to authenticate and identify each product or plant. The rules resulted in the creation of what the state calls Marijuana Inventory Tracking Solutions (MITS)"”a system that the Department of Revenue's Marijuana Enforcement Division intends to use to track the pot from the greenhouse in which it is grown to the store where the drug is sold. MITS consists of software developed by Florida technology company Franwell.

The MITS software, residing on Colorado's database, is designed to track each plant or package"”beginning with the moment a marijuana cutting is first planted. To monitor what each cannabis plant or product consists of, as well as where it originated, the state is employing EPC Gen 2 UHF RFID tags supplied by Franwell. Marijuana growers must purchase these tags"”available in various forms, including as a hangtag or an adhesive label"”and attach them to the plants themselves, or to packages of processed marijuana.

Read Full Article