Executive Briefings

What DHS Has Failed to Fix, Is Fixable

Among many of its problems, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has three that are serious vulnerabilities for the United States: In-Bonds, Transshipments, and Outbound Container Shipments. These three issues are also important for the U.S. International Trade Commission's role in protecting intellectual property rights. These are not new and there are multiple options to address and correct them. What is more disturbing is that it is well known that these agencies are aware of these vulnerabilities but have not addressed them. The fact that DHS focuses on air, as recently demonstrated by the Transportation Security Administration's recent Pat-down situation, seems to suggest that because terrorists used aircraft, its attention should be on air travelers. Clearly, the more obvious mode of transport in causing the greatest degree of injury is motor and rail carriage. It could be that DHS is primarily a reactive agency and it is waiting for a container or port-related attack to address these obvious container and port issues.

This analysis will provide a summary view of each of these vulnerabilities, and provide solutions to address them with existing technology and processes available in private-sector markets today. The solutions will also identify different firms with different offerings which have no financial dealings together or joint operational or joint corporate activities. These potential solutions are out there to be reviewed and used as appropriate.

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Among many of its problems, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has three that are serious vulnerabilities for the United States: In-Bonds, Transshipments, and Outbound Container Shipments. These three issues are also important for the U.S. International Trade Commission's role in protecting intellectual property rights. These are not new and there are multiple options to address and correct them. What is more disturbing is that it is well known that these agencies are aware of these vulnerabilities but have not addressed them. The fact that DHS focuses on air, as recently demonstrated by the Transportation Security Administration's recent Pat-down situation, seems to suggest that because terrorists used aircraft, its attention should be on air travelers. Clearly, the more obvious mode of transport in causing the greatest degree of injury is motor and rail carriage. It could be that DHS is primarily a reactive agency and it is waiting for a container or port-related attack to address these obvious container and port issues.

This analysis will provide a summary view of each of these vulnerabilities, and provide solutions to address them with existing technology and processes available in private-sector markets today. The solutions will also identify different firms with different offerings which have no financial dealings together or joint operational or joint corporate activities. These potential solutions are out there to be reviewed and used as appropriate.

Read Full Article