Executive Briefings

At General Cable, Thinking 'Lean' Has Become 'Natural Instinct'

Some 10 or so years ago, senior leadership at General Cable Corp. seized upon lean manufacturing as a means to differentiate the company, later complemented with a Six Sigma methodology. Lean's attraction for the manufacturer of copper, aluminum and fiber optic wire and cable products was both its waste-elimination component and its reliance on the talents of the entire workforce to continually improve.

"In order to have control of our destiny, we needed to have a best cost position," says Gregory Kenny, General Cable's president and chief executive officer.

Today, he says, "We've got an army of change agents who think about lean as a natural instinct as opposed to, 'Oh it's time to think about lean.' Making the company better continually has allowed us to really get through some tough times."

Read Full Article

Some 10 or so years ago, senior leadership at General Cable Corp. seized upon lean manufacturing as a means to differentiate the company, later complemented with a Six Sigma methodology. Lean's attraction for the manufacturer of copper, aluminum and fiber optic wire and cable products was both its waste-elimination component and its reliance on the talents of the entire workforce to continually improve.

"In order to have control of our destiny, we needed to have a best cost position," says Gregory Kenny, General Cable's president and chief executive officer.

Today, he says, "We've got an army of change agents who think about lean as a natural instinct as opposed to, 'Oh it's time to think about lean.' Making the company better continually has allowed us to really get through some tough times."

Read Full Article