Executive Briefings

Clothing Industry Start-ups Beginning to Start Up - in the U.S.

A nascent trend of clothing start-ups bringing business back to American factories in under way. Over the past two decades, there was a 90 percent decline in apparel manufacturing industry in the U.S., from 940,000 jobs in 1990 to 136,000 in 2015. This has been in part due to the Trans-Pacific Partnerships, which provide incentives such as lower tariffs for companies that want to produce clothes overseas - though the merits of free trade have been hotly contested in this election cycle.

Clothing Industry Start-ups Beginning to Start Up – in the U.S.

Recently, however, something interesting has happened. "After a mass exodus of manufacturing jobs overseas, we stopped losing jobs in 2012 - and local manufacturing began to remain stable," says Bob Bland, founder and CEO of Manufacture New York, an organization that helps fashion start-ups create their products in New York City. "This is the first victory for those of us committed to manufacturing locally."

Part of this shift can be attributed to the clothing start-ups that have started moving back into American factories instead of instinctively going overseas. Bland also believes that these numbers underestimate how much work is being done in the U.S. because many fashion designers and artisans are not being counted by Bureau of Labor Statistics. "The maker movement has happened during the last few years, and not all makers consider themselves industrial manufacturers," Bland says.

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Recently, however, something interesting has happened. "After a mass exodus of manufacturing jobs overseas, we stopped losing jobs in 2012 - and local manufacturing began to remain stable," says Bob Bland, founder and CEO of Manufacture New York, an organization that helps fashion start-ups create their products in New York City. "This is the first victory for those of us committed to manufacturing locally."

Part of this shift can be attributed to the clothing start-ups that have started moving back into American factories instead of instinctively going overseas. Bland also believes that these numbers underestimate how much work is being done in the U.S. because many fashion designers and artisans are not being counted by Bureau of Labor Statistics. "The maker movement has happened during the last few years, and not all makers consider themselves industrial manufacturers," Bland says.

Read Full Article

Clothing Industry Start-ups Beginning to Start Up – in the U.S.