Executive Briefings

IoT Devices Becoming More Common Hosts for Hijacked Data, Researchers Say

The vision of the so-called internet of things - giving all sorts of physical things a digital makeover - has been years ahead of reality. But that gap is closing fast, according to Gartner, a research firm. Today, the range of things being computerized and connected to networks is stunning, from watches, appliances and clothing to cars, jet engines and factory equipment. Even roadways and farm fields are being upgraded with digital sensors. In the last two years, the number of internet-of-things devices in the world has surged nearly 70 percent to 6.4 billion, Gartner says. By 2020, the firm forecasts, the internet-of-things population will reach 20.8 billion.

IoT Devices Becoming More Common Hosts for Hijacked Data, Researchers Say

The optimistic outlook is that the internet of things will be an enabling technology that will help make the people and physical systems of the world - healthcare, food production, transportation, energy consumption - smarter and more efficient.

The pessimistic outlook? Hackers will have something else to hack. And consumers accustomed to adding security tools to their computers and phones should expect to adopt similar precautions with internet-connected home appliances.

"If we want to put networked technologies into more and more things, we also have to find a way to make them safer," said Michael Walker, a program manager and computer security expert at the Pentagon’s advanced research arm. "It's a challenge for civilization."

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The optimistic outlook is that the internet of things will be an enabling technology that will help make the people and physical systems of the world - healthcare, food production, transportation, energy consumption - smarter and more efficient.

The pessimistic outlook? Hackers will have something else to hack. And consumers accustomed to adding security tools to their computers and phones should expect to adopt similar precautions with internet-connected home appliances.

"If we want to put networked technologies into more and more things, we also have to find a way to make them safer," said Michael Walker, a program manager and computer security expert at the Pentagon’s advanced research arm. "It's a challenge for civilization."

Read Full Article

IoT Devices Becoming More Common Hosts for Hijacked Data, Researchers Say