Executive Briefings

Meet the Woman Advising the World's Top Blockchain Companies

The blockchain landscape is commanding an increasing amount of attention. With more first-time companies and applications vying for ICOs, interest in the long-term viabilities of technologies based on the blockchain is also growing.

One of the questions many blockchain developers and entrepreneurs must answer to investors who may be intrigued, but skeptical, regarding the actual potential use of their blockchain solution is scalability, and inclusion. Luckily for entrepreneurs eager to make an impact in this space, more resources are popping up to help burgeoning ventures to hone their applications and refine their unique value propositions in the field.

I recently chatted with Tiffany Madison, one of the founding partners at DecentraNet, a full-service blockchain advisory, to learn more about the consultancy’s offerings and why the blockchain space needs guidance now more than ever. As a woman at the forefront of a growing company in the blockchain, Madison’s insights not only cover where blockchain as a whole needs to go, but also, how the vertical can transform into a more diverse and inclusive industry.

Lisa Winning: Do you feel there is a gender equality gap in blockchain and if so why?

Tiffany Madison: Like the broader tech industry, there is a gender equality gap in blockchain technology. I think this is attributed to the fact that in the initial days of crypto, the earliest voices advocating widespread adoption of privacy-enhancing cryptography (as a facilitator for social and political change), were mostly male. That is changing.

Speaking only for myself: while there is certainly a disparity between men and women in this space, I think the industry is rapidly evolving into a culture of inclusion. In my experience, the community is comprised of highly conscientious individuals that sincerely strive to include women and all underrepresented groups in the industry. These efforts will naturally continue to attract more female involvement. This is important to me. I have three nieces and a four-month-old daughter. I want as many opportunities open for them in this world, and want to only be a part of cultures that would actively welcome them.

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One of the questions many blockchain developers and entrepreneurs must answer to investors who may be intrigued, but skeptical, regarding the actual potential use of their blockchain solution is scalability, and inclusion. Luckily for entrepreneurs eager to make an impact in this space, more resources are popping up to help burgeoning ventures to hone their applications and refine their unique value propositions in the field.

I recently chatted with Tiffany Madison, one of the founding partners at DecentraNet, a full-service blockchain advisory, to learn more about the consultancy’s offerings and why the blockchain space needs guidance now more than ever. As a woman at the forefront of a growing company in the blockchain, Madison’s insights not only cover where blockchain as a whole needs to go, but also, how the vertical can transform into a more diverse and inclusive industry.

Lisa Winning: Do you feel there is a gender equality gap in blockchain and if so why?

Tiffany Madison: Like the broader tech industry, there is a gender equality gap in blockchain technology. I think this is attributed to the fact that in the initial days of crypto, the earliest voices advocating widespread adoption of privacy-enhancing cryptography (as a facilitator for social and political change), were mostly male. That is changing.

Speaking only for myself: while there is certainly a disparity between men and women in this space, I think the industry is rapidly evolving into a culture of inclusion. In my experience, the community is comprised of highly conscientious individuals that sincerely strive to include women and all underrepresented groups in the industry. These efforts will naturally continue to attract more female involvement. This is important to me. I have three nieces and a four-month-old daughter. I want as many opportunities open for them in this world, and want to only be a part of cultures that would actively welcome them.

Read full article