Executive Briefings

Spanish Hospital Tracks Patients and Assets with RFID Technology

Spain's University Hospital of Valencia (La Fe) is employing a real-time locating system (RTLS) to track patients and assets throughout its 260,000-square-meter (2.8 million-square-foot) facility, and to allow staff members to identify patients via mobile carts with built-in RFID readers.

The technology was provided by MySphera, a division of the TSB Group. The solution provides the hospital with a view into the locations of both patients and assets, in order to improve the quality of care provided, by making it faster and easier to locate equipment, patients and personnel, as well as safer, since it also helps ensure that every patient receives the proper medication or other care intended for that individual, thereby reducing the risk of errors.

La Fe, one of the nation's largest hospitals, monitors as many as 1,500 patients at any given time using MySphera's RTLS solution, known as SpheraHospital, which features battery-powered RFID tags attached to assets and patient wristbands. Each tag transmits a unique ID number every two seconds via a 2.4 GHz signal. That signal is received by fixed beacons to determine the tag's location, and by mobile beacons connected to computers, which then display information about the patient wearing that tag.

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The technology was provided by MySphera, a division of the TSB Group. The solution provides the hospital with a view into the locations of both patients and assets, in order to improve the quality of care provided, by making it faster and easier to locate equipment, patients and personnel, as well as safer, since it also helps ensure that every patient receives the proper medication or other care intended for that individual, thereby reducing the risk of errors.

La Fe, one of the nation's largest hospitals, monitors as many as 1,500 patients at any given time using MySphera's RTLS solution, known as SpheraHospital, which features battery-powered RFID tags attached to assets and patient wristbands. Each tag transmits a unique ID number every two seconds via a 2.4 GHz signal. That signal is received by fixed beacons to determine the tag's location, and by mobile beacons connected to computers, which then display information about the patient wearing that tag.

Read Full Article