Executive Briefings

To Keep Crops From Rotting, Farmers Say They Need Trump to Let in More Temporary Workers

The sun hasn't cracked the horizon when Alfredo Betancourt and 19 of his countrymen line up behind a packing trailer, knives in hand, knee deep in dewy cauliflower plants.

To Keep Crops From Rotting, Farmers Say They Need Trump to Let in More Temporary Workers

A tractor growls, the packing trailer jerks into motion and Betancourt and his co-workers begin their routine: walk, stoop, cut, toss. Walk, stoop, cut, toss.

By the time the dense fog lifts from California's Salinas Valley, the crew has cut enough cauliflower to fill a dozen produce aisle bins at a local grocery store.

They will crisscross this and dozens of other fields eight hours a day, six days a week, for nine months, sleeping three to a room in hotels long since shunned by tourists. Come December, they'll board a bus and return to Mexico. Richer, they hope.

More than 11,000 foreign guest workers like Betancourt were approved last year to harvest the lettuce, fruit and vegetables for California's $47bn agricultural industry — a fivefold increase from 2011, according to Los Angeles Times analysis of U.S. Labor Department data.

If this year's hiring pace holds, that number will soar even higher.

Read Full Article

A tractor growls, the packing trailer jerks into motion and Betancourt and his co-workers begin their routine: walk, stoop, cut, toss. Walk, stoop, cut, toss.

By the time the dense fog lifts from California's Salinas Valley, the crew has cut enough cauliflower to fill a dozen produce aisle bins at a local grocery store.

They will crisscross this and dozens of other fields eight hours a day, six days a week, for nine months, sleeping three to a room in hotels long since shunned by tourists. Come December, they'll board a bus and return to Mexico. Richer, they hope.

More than 11,000 foreign guest workers like Betancourt were approved last year to harvest the lettuce, fruit and vegetables for California's $47bn agricultural industry — a fivefold increase from 2011, according to Los Angeles Times analysis of U.S. Labor Department data.

If this year's hiring pace holds, that number will soar even higher.

Read Full Article

To Keep Crops From Rotting, Farmers Say They Need Trump to Let in More Temporary Workers