Executive Briefings

WERC's State of the Warehousing Industry

In addition to professional programs, the Warehousing Education & Research Council now assesses members' processes so they know if they accord with industry best practices, says Michael Mikitka, CEO of WERC.

Such issues as the cost of fuel and government regulation will always be top of mind for transportation and logistics companies, and their partners in warehousing. The message then that WERC wants to get out is that it is there to provide complete and accurate information for its membership as it faces these tough challenges.

"Members are looking for solutions for problems and challenges, and they come to WERC for that," Mikitka says.

A newly released study on transportation capacity exemplifies the kind of help that the council provides its membership. "We're always looking for ways to give them information to make sound decisions."

WERC members also are seeking to partner with others, and the council can help with that as well. "They want ideas and solutions on how to collaborate in a way that's a win-win for all."

In addition to webcasts on topical issues and the sessions it organizes at its annual conference, WERC has begun a certification procedure that Mikitka believes will greatly benefit the membership.

Started last year, the methodology standardized best practices in the industry into eight discrete areas and 114 processes.

"We have an independent auditor who goes in and verifies for a company just what stage its practices are in. Companies walk away with the ability to see exactly where they are at, where the gaps and strengths are."

As nearshoring and insourcing continue to grow, warehousing and distribution will become even more active, says Mikitka. Certification then becomes an important way to remain competitive.

To view video in its entirety, click here


Keywords: Education & Professional Development, Quality & Metrics, Warehouse Logistics, Warehouse Management, Global Supply Chain Management, Logistics, Technology, Warehousing Best Practices

Such issues as the cost of fuel and government regulation will always be top of mind for transportation and logistics companies, and their partners in warehousing. The message then that WERC wants to get out is that it is there to provide complete and accurate information for its membership as it faces these tough challenges.

"Members are looking for solutions for problems and challenges, and they come to WERC for that," Mikitka says.

A newly released study on transportation capacity exemplifies the kind of help that the council provides its membership. "We're always looking for ways to give them information to make sound decisions."

WERC members also are seeking to partner with others, and the council can help with that as well. "They want ideas and solutions on how to collaborate in a way that's a win-win for all."

In addition to webcasts on topical issues and the sessions it organizes at its annual conference, WERC has begun a certification procedure that Mikitka believes will greatly benefit the membership.

Started last year, the methodology standardized best practices in the industry into eight discrete areas and 114 processes.

"We have an independent auditor who goes in and verifies for a company just what stage its practices are in. Companies walk away with the ability to see exactly where they are at, where the gaps and strengths are."

As nearshoring and insourcing continue to grow, warehousing and distribution will become even more active, says Mikitka. Certification then becomes an important way to remain competitive.

To view video in its entirety, click here


Keywords: Education & Professional Development, Quality & Metrics, Warehouse Logistics, Warehouse Management, Global Supply Chain Management, Logistics, Technology, Warehousing Best Practices