Executive Briefings

Women More Concerned Than Men About Joining Companies With Poor Reputations, Study Says

Eighty-six percent of American females would not join a company with a bad reputation compared to only 67 percent of American males, according to poll findings provided by Corporate Responsibility Magazine.

Women More Concerned Than Men About Joining Companies With Poor Reputations, Study Says

"The results of this year's survey again demonstrated the implications of a bad reputation. Talent is often unwilling to consider an employment offer, and when they do, it's for a premium over what companies with a good reputation can offer," said Elliot Clark, CEO of Corporate Responsibility Magazine.

According to respondents, the bad behaviors most harmful to a company's culture and reputation include public exposure of criminal acts (33 percent); failure to recall defective products (30 percent); public disclosure of workplace discrimination (21 percent); and public disclosure of environmental scandal (15 percent).

Of the employed Americans surveyed, only 67 percent would take a job with a company that had a bad reputation if they were offered more money. In 2014, 70 percent of respondents were willing to take a job with a company with a bad reputation for more money. Of the 2015 respondents, 46 percent would need a pay increase of 50 percent or more to consider moving to a company with an unfavorable reputation.

Surprisingly, young people (18-34 year age range) are the least concerned about corporate reputation. Over three-quarters (77 percent) would take a job with a company with a bad reputation vs. 61 percent of those 35 years and older.

In contrast, the vast majority, 92 percent, would consider leaving their current jobs if offered another role with a company that had an excellent corporate reputation. Forty five percent of 35- to 44-year-olds would leave their current job for less than a ten percent pay increase to join an excellent company. In contrast, only twelve percent of the same group would leave their current job for less than a ten percent pay increase to join a company with a bad reputation.

Source: Corporate Responsibility

"The results of this year's survey again demonstrated the implications of a bad reputation. Talent is often unwilling to consider an employment offer, and when they do, it's for a premium over what companies with a good reputation can offer," said Elliot Clark, CEO of Corporate Responsibility Magazine.

According to respondents, the bad behaviors most harmful to a company's culture and reputation include public exposure of criminal acts (33 percent); failure to recall defective products (30 percent); public disclosure of workplace discrimination (21 percent); and public disclosure of environmental scandal (15 percent).

Of the employed Americans surveyed, only 67 percent would take a job with a company that had a bad reputation if they were offered more money. In 2014, 70 percent of respondents were willing to take a job with a company with a bad reputation for more money. Of the 2015 respondents, 46 percent would need a pay increase of 50 percent or more to consider moving to a company with an unfavorable reputation.

Surprisingly, young people (18-34 year age range) are the least concerned about corporate reputation. Over three-quarters (77 percent) would take a job with a company with a bad reputation vs. 61 percent of those 35 years and older.

In contrast, the vast majority, 92 percent, would consider leaving their current jobs if offered another role with a company that had an excellent corporate reputation. Forty five percent of 35- to 44-year-olds would leave their current job for less than a ten percent pay increase to join an excellent company. In contrast, only twelve percent of the same group would leave their current job for less than a ten percent pay increase to join a company with a bad reputation.

Source: Corporate Responsibility

Women More Concerned Than Men About Joining Companies With Poor Reputations, Study Says